Problem 09 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
The pressure in a gas tank is 2.75 atmospheres. Compute the pressure in kiloPascal and the pressure head in meter of water.
 

Problem 08 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
What is the pressure in pounds per square inch 4 ft below the surface of a liquid of sp. gr. 1.50 if the gas pressure on the surface is 0.4 atmosphere?
 

Problem 07 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
If the pressure in the tank of oil (sp gr 0.80) is 415 kPa, what is the equivalent head: (a) in meters of oil, (b) in meters of water, and (c) in centimeters of mercury?
 

Problem 06 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
If the pressure in the tank of oil (sp gr 0.80) is 60 psi, what is the equivalent head: (a) in feet of oil, (b) in feet of water, and (c) in inches of mercury?
 

Problem 05 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
At what depth in a stand pipe containing water is the pressure 200 kPa?
 

Problem 04 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
What height of mercury column will cause a pressure of 680 kPa? What is the equivalent height of water column?
 

Problem 03 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
Take sea water to be 3% heavier than fresh water and assume it is incompressible. What is the pressure, in metric ton per square meter, at 3.22 km below the surface of the ocean if fresh water weighs 9.79 kN/m3?
 

Problem 02 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
Determine the pressure on the face of a dam at a point 12 m below the water surface, in (a) kilo Pascal gauge; (b) kilogram per square meter gauge; (c) kilo Pascal absolute; (d) pounds per square foot gauge; (e) pounds per square inch gauge; and (e) pounds per square inch absolute.
 

Problem 01 - Variation of Pressure

Problem
Determine the pressure in a vessel of mercury, specific gravity 13.6, at a point 20 cm below the surface. Express the answer in N/m2.
 

Variation of Pressure with Depth in a Fluid

Consider two points 1 and 2 lie in the ends of fluid prism having a cross-sectional area dA and length L. The difference in elevation between these two points is h as shown in Figure 02 below. The fluid is at rest and its surface is free. The prism is therefore in equilibrium and all forces acting on it sums up to zero.
 

fig-02_variations-in-pressure.gif

 

Note: FFS stands for Free Fluid Surface which refers to fluid surface subject to zero gauge pressure.
 

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